severed

torso 2s

to set in stone–
the whiteness of marble
polished, glowing,
rendered with light

an image meant to be immortal

plundered and abused
by the movements
of men and time—

faceless and unlimbed now

the imperfection of decay–
reassembling beginnings
over shadows
of the end

Merril is the host for the dVerse quadrille, using the word “set”.  I drew this Greek sculpture torso a while ago, and added some watercolor on top of the drawing.  What remains of the original figure has its own beauty.

22 thoughts on “severed

  1. I wonder if this one had the Victorian fig leaf treatment?
    Greek sculptures (of nude male bodies) always make me think the sculptor and the commissioner were more interested in the portrayal of perfection than humanity.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. You captured the shimmer of marble in the first stanza, Kerfe, and my attention – it took me back to Florence. I like how the twist is introduced in the first isolated line ‘an image meant to be immortal’, and then the perfect image is destroyed, ‘plundered and abused’. It made me think about all the faceless, unlimbed statues I’ve seen, and wonder about how they must have looked when they were first created. I love the lines:
    ‘reassembling beginnings
    over shadows
    of the end’.

    Like

    1. Thanks Kim. I remember the sculptures of Italy…I even have a sketch book from my visit 40 years ago somewhere (now I’ll have to look for it). I do think the imprint of what was remains on what is.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. This is such a thought-provoking poem, Kerfe. “An image meant to be immortal” and “the imperfection of decay”–it’s sad to see art plundered or destroyed art (whether on purpose or accidental), but I like the idea that it still endures. It makes me think of Ozymandias.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I’m always seeing faces, but I definitely see two faces left and center, at or below the chest. I believe they’re musing over the public’s opinion of the body as a whole and how it has affected the art over the years.

    Like

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