the answer to all of your questions

the answer s

it is not
forever not
everlasting neither
early nor late–
it is not never
not now

it’s located where
it can’t be seen
but it is not lost–
just somewhere
that is nowhere
or perhaps elsewhere

it’s a series of endless
clues in a game
without an end–
a spiral upended
down into
bottomless time

whereupon
it returns
from nevermore
to anywhere–
ending up as
it began–wherever

A poem using the repetitive technique of polyptoton, the challenge from Frank at dVerse, for Sue Vincent’s photo prompt, above.

the answer close up s

I tend to use a lot of repetition, but not exactly in this way.  An interesting exercise.

 

summoning

summoning s

songs rising, the path becomes
a spiral intersecting
the surface of forgotten
dreams, the edge of the held breath
which abides in all places,
a luminescence engraved
on the far side of the light

A sevens poem (via Jane Dougherty) for Sue Vincent’s photo prompt, above.  Once again, even as I am constrained by what images I find in my collage box, they manage to take me somewhere I would not have found on my own.

summoning close up s

Also linked to OLN on dVerse, hosted by Lillian.

 

reconciliation

reconciliation s

I am
always only
partway there–

I know what to avoid
but not how
to release what has departed.

I used to chase the seasons–
now I wait for what is given–
intangible substances–

the perimeter expands,
the sky is higher,
placed carefully in the interval.

The predictable
always takes you by surprise–
you can still retreat

but you can’t follow any forecast–
the combinations are secret
and without form.

What remains is reflection–
the transient continually rearranged
into something resembling a life.

For Sue Vincent’s photo prompt, above.  Magpies seem to be one of those places where opposites meet.  What we take away from them depends on what we bring.

reconciliation close up s

 

 

gathering

gathering s

singing the stones,
ancient and yet still present
in wind that rustles
the trees—the way the birds rise
as one from branches to meet
the glowing edge of the sky

A bussokusekika  (written in a 5-7-5-7-7-7 pattern) for Sue Vincent’s photo prompt, above.  I recently saw several poets using this form, and decided to try it myself.

gathering close up s

Still listening to the wind.